Developing flavor

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Tony Livingston Tony Livingston 2 months ago.

Developing flavor

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    This Ontario based producer has their own special way of boiling sap to produce a darker, more robust syrup. Do you any of you have a method to develop a preferred taste? I personally enjoy a deeper flavor syrup.

    • This topic was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Jamie Albert Jamie Albert.
    • This topic was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Jamie Albert Jamie Albert.
    • This topic was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by Wsxn3tuser wsxn3tuser.
    • This topic was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Jamie Albert Jamie Albert.
    • This topic was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Jamie Albert Jamie Albert.
    • This topic was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by Wsxn3tuser wsxn3tuser.
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    I’m not able to open your link.  Typically we make all the dark syrup we want in a given year.  I truly value high grade, light syrup, so I aim to make as much as I can.  Light syrup is more versatile for making confections which I really enjoy doing for our own use.

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    Hm, clicking the words “Ontario based producer” should redirect you to a video about their maple operation. Web developers are working on this.

    You said that lighter syrup is more versatile for making confections. Do you mean that flavor-wise, lighter flavored syrup combines better with other ingredients? Or does the chemistry of lighter syrup lend itself to working better in certain recipes? I’d love to hear more about that!

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    Yep, clicking on “Ontario…” takes me to a short video where the producer explains that they use a flat pan, and that results in darker syrup.

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    <p>We’re fairly new to sugarmaking, and boil on a flat pan over a homemade arch. So we tend to make darker syrup overall also. Our work schedules also influence the time we have available to boil, so we usually have to store sap for a few days before we boil, which we think leads to darker syrup. Since we batch boil, we often take the concentrated sweet and refrigerate until we are able to finish, up to a week later. I believe this also may lead to darker syrup. We have many customers who prefer a stronger flavored syrup, including a local distillery/cafe who purchased a few gallons this year for their breakfast menu.</p>
    <p>We’re hoping to step up to a “real” evaporator for next season, with a divided flat pan. In order to be able to satisfy those customers who like the darker syrup, I think we may also purchase a non-divided flat ban for batch production, and will swap pans depending upon what we want to try and produce. In a bid for creative marketing, we intend to add an additional label to the darker bottles, calling it “legacy”.</p>
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      Hi Tony, I appreciate the creative direction you are taking with your Legacy syrup. To create a specialty or value-added line is another way to add profit when selling your syrup. It’s great to distinguish the options you are offering and build off your line. There is a company called Runamok that has a full line of infused syrups for various culinary uses, including cocktail pairings. They call their original un-blended organic maple syrup “Sugarmaker’s Cut” and sell it in a different shaped bottle than their infused syrups. So, incorporating a divided pan to make lighter syrup also means being able to efficiently produce a more cost-effective lighter syrup with less fuel, while the syrup being cooked down in the flat pan will still take more TLC to produce. Will this affect your pricing scale when selling? I realize I’ve turned this into a marketing question, but it’s very interesting to me!

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      <p>It’s interesting to us also. We haven’t discussed our pricing structure for the legacy just yet, but I do think the increased amount of time/labor spent on the batch boil might merit a slight price increase over the lighter, continuous syrup we hope to make on the divided pan. What fascinates me, is how lighter syrup has traditionally brought a higher price than dark syrup. We have customers who prefer light syrup, but the majority want a more robust, dark product. I do hope we can produce more light syrup next year, in order to try our hand at making maple cream. </p>

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